TAC 2 / Knowledge Hub

TAC KNOWLEDGE HUB

Interested in recruiting an apprentice? Just looking to find out more about skills? Browse our FAQs for employers and individuals below.  Find out where to get info, browse our latest reports and links to other organisations doing important work in this space. 

FAQ FOR EMPLOYERS:

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An apprenticeship is a vocational qualification which mixes formal education with a structured programme of work based learning to meet agreed standards of competency and knowledge. There are nearly 200 types of apprenticeship within a variety of industry sectors ranging from accountancy to veterinary nursing via floristry. Of course this also includes engineering.

An apprenticeship can range from a Level 2 Intermediate to a Level 3 Advanced, Level 6 Degree, and even Level 7 Masters apprenticeships. Most engineering apprenticeships start at Level 3 with a minimum requirement of 5 A-B GCSE's, with a mandatory in maths. Once a full apprenticeship is completed, you can move through the different levels.

These qualifications allow apprentices to fulfil the requirements of the competence-based component of the apprenticeship standards, along with appropriate underpinning knowledge and the acquisition of professional attributes. They also meet the requirements for Technician and Degree level Membership of the relevant Institutions.

These qualifications have many advantages, including:

  • They conform to the requirements of the training agreement already in place with the professional institutions. Its format is therefore familiar to engineering mentors within the company.
  • The competences are described in broad enough terms to allow for them to be achieved in a wide variety of engineering occupations. This means that there can be a coherent delivery mechanism across the company.
  • They offer natural progression routes, for those that want to pursue them, to Incorporated and Chartered Engineer with the appropriate formal education and training input.
    Their professional credentials mean that they are an attractive alternative to consider.

An apprenticeship is fully funded for an apprentice and costs them nothing. If you are an employer paying more than £3 million a year in wages, you must pay the apprenticeship levy.

As part of an apprenticeship, the employee will attend college on a day release basis, some providers work with a 'block release' system. Within a business, the achievement of the competences should be integrated into their daily work. Support will be given to help the apprentices with evidence collection which will be assessed and signed off on a regular basis by company and provider staff.

Typically, a level 3 course lasts for two years with the work based element continuing for up to a further year – a maximum of three years in all. A level 6 course will last up to five years.  

 

There is a list of training providers on the website who work with member companies to deliver and assess the various elements of the apprenticeship standards. Providers will be more than happy to help you with the process of advertising for, and recruiting, an apprentice. In England this is free if you advertise via the Government's Find an Apprentice website.  

If you are still looking for advice, please contact us as we'll be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak recently announced the Kickstart Scheme, a new £2 billion funded incentive to encourage young people into the workplace. The scheme will fund new six month job placements for young people who are currently on universal credit and ‘at risk’ of long-term unemployment. The scheme usually requires a minimum of 30 applicants. However, TAC is acting as a facilitating body and as such can collectively make applications on ACE and EIC members’ behalf, no matter their size.

The apprenticeships are nationally recognised and available, so you do not need to be involved with TAC. However, being involved in either the regional or trailblazer groups are a great way for your company to have a say in the content, assessment and quality assurance of the TAC standards and future standards.

FAQ FOR CANDIDATES/APPRENTICES:

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An apprenticeship combines real employment, college learning and work experience to ensure that you have the right balance of technical and practical skills. As employees, apprentices earn a wage and work alongside experienced staff to gain job-specific skills. Off the job, on day-release or block-release basis, apprentices receive training to work towards nationally recognised vocational and academic qualifications.

An Apprenticeship is for 16+ employees with at least five GCSEs including Maths (at grade B), English and a Science subject (grade C or above) who are aspiring to take up highly skilled roles within a company. The Engineering Apprenticeship start at Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship and now you can complete a Level 6 (Degree Apprenticeship), even a level 7 masters Degree Apprenticeship in some sectors.

You can do lots of different Apprenticeships in Engineering for example Civil, Building Services, Environmental, Rail Design and Transport Planning.

The qualification will provide you with a structured programme to develop your engineering knowledge, skills and understanding these apprenticeships are designed to meet the requirements for professional Membership with the relevant Institution. As such, should you be successful, you gain professional recognition and letters after your name.  

They also offer natural progression routes, for those that want to pursue them, to Incorporated and Chartered Engineer with the appropriate formal education and training input.  This means that you can pursue a career as a professional engineer and earn while you learn.

Apprenticeships are available if you are leaving school, have been working for years or are seeking to start a new career. You have to be at least 16 years old.

As part of the apprenticeship you will attend college/university on a day release basis. In the company, the achievement of the competences should be part and parcel of your daily work. Support will be given to help you with evidence collection which will be assessed and signed off on a regular basis by company and provider staff.

Typically, a level 3 course lasts for two years with the work based element continuing for up to a further year – a maximum of three years in all. A level 6 course will last up to five years. 

There are a number of different ways to find out about vacancies.  Many companies post apprenticeship vacancies on their website. They will appear on their websites usually between March and September. You can also register on the Find an Apprenticeship website where all providers will post vacancies on behalf of employers. 

Applying for an apprenticeship is like applying for a job so you will have to go through an application process. This will usually involve a written application and then an interview where you will have to impress the employer.

For help with your application, please read the great guidance, How to write a winning apprenticeship application.

The short answer is no!

Please do read all the advice and guidance on our site, but please note although we encourage employers to take on apprentices, we cannot work directly with individuals. Many thanks for your understanding.

Read the latest reports, guidance and advice from TAC:

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USEFUL LINKS:

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CONTACT US 

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Dr. Caroline Sudworth

Dr. Caroline Sudworth

Education Consultant

Caroline leads the trailblazer group activity and manages TAC's eight apprenticeship standards.

Kimberly Murphy

Kimberly Murphy

Apprenticeship and Skills Manager

Manages the TAC programme and relationships with employers and training providers.

phone07940 410 205